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The world’s most valuable liquor company is now Chinese

The world’s most valuable liquor company is now Chinese

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The company that makes China’s eye-wateringly strong Moutai drink is edging out Diageo (DEO), the owner of Johnnie Walker, as the world’s most valuable liquor firm. Kweichow Moutai, whose fiery signature product has an alcohol content of 53%, hit a market capitalization of $71.5 billion on Friday, pushing it past Diageo.

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How China’s Kweichow Moutai Is Intoxicating Liquor Market

How China’s Kweichow Moutai Is Intoxicating Liquor Market

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When Chinese President Xi Jinping started to tackle official displays of excess more than three years ago, one local company suffered more than the others. Kweichow Moutai, whose pricey grain liquor became a staple of state banquets and a typical gift, saw its sales dip by as much as 30%.

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Moser: You Are Not Going To Stop China

Moser: You Are Not Going To Stop China

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The ambition of Chinese wine producers to play among the world’s top players is “unbelievable”, says Lenz Moser, consultant winemaker to China’s biggest producer, who is steadfast in his belief that China is the future. “China is the future because the market is exploding as we speak,” said Lenz Moser, consultant winemaker to China’s Château Changyu since 2005, speaking to the drinks business at ProWein in Düsseldorf.

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The World’s Most Valued Spirit Is One You (Probably) Haven’t Heard Of

The World’s Most Valued Spirit Is One You (Probably) Haven’t Heard Of

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Brand Finance released its annual report on the most valuable beer and spirit brands, and for the first time, baijiu (bye-j’oh) labels came out on top, with a brand value market share of 37.5 percent and combined value of over $22 billion.

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Chinese Baijiu overtakes whisky as most valuable spirit

Chinese Baijiu overtakes whisky as most valuable spirit

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Baijiu, the fiery Chinese alcoholic drink, has overtaken Whisky to become the world’s most valuable spirit, according to Brand Finance. Baijiu’s share of total brand value grew from 23% in 2016 to 37.5% in 2017. The surge saw the Chinese beverage, which is made from wheat, overtake Whisky, which dropped from 37% in 2016 to 28% in 2017.

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BAIJIU: THE WORLD’S MOST-CONSUMED YET LEAST UNDERSTOOD ALCOHOL

BAIJIU: THE WORLD’S MOST-CONSUMED YET LEAST UNDERSTOOD ALCOHOL

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Unlike tequila or vodka, baijiu (白酒 báijiǔ), which literally means “clear liquor,” has yet to become popular in the West. To the unfamiliar palate, baijiu can smell and taste quite strong, and Dan Rather once compared its taste to “liquid razor blades.” Baijiu has gained a bad reputation amongst Westerners who have been to China because of the way it is consumed in bouts at the banquets and celebratory dinners that are part of doing business in China.

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The Future of Southern Drinking

The Future of Southern Drinking

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Some think that historiography is a science more or less like ballistics; that the careful plotting of where a phenomenon has been enables you to predict where it is going. If only the world were thus! The future, as history shows us, is essentially impervious to investigation.

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How to drink baijiu: Beijing’s pros share their tips

How to drink baijiu: Beijing’s pros share their tips

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It’s the most widely drunk hard liquor in the world but it’s rarely found on cocktail menus. Baijiu, distilled from sorghum and rice, rules every festive occasion in China, where it’s the tipple of choice for everything from wedding receptions to business banquets.

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Is the Baijiu Hype Really All That?

Is the Baijiu Hype Really All That?

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As spirits go, baijiu (BYE-joe), which is Chinese for “white spirit,” must suffer from a serious inferiority complex in the U.S. While it holds a roughly 38 percent share in global spirits consumption, it has yet to take America by storm.

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History in a Bottle: The Story of Moutai

History in a Bottle: The Story of Moutai

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In China, there is an alcohol that’s been credited with improving international relations and uniting opposing empires. Described as the “drink of diplomacy,” it takes five years to produce a single bottle, and for nearly 400 years it has been distilled using traditional techniques out of a single town in China’s Guizhou Province.

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