News

The Future of Southern Drinking

The Future of Southern Drinking

News

Some think that historiography is a science more or less like ballistics; that the careful plotting of where a phenomenon has been enables you to predict where it is going. If only the world were thus! The future, as history shows us, is essentially impervious to investigation.

Read More

How to drink baijiu: Beijing’s pros share their tips

How to drink baijiu: Beijing’s pros share their tips

News

It’s the most widely drunk hard liquor in the world but it’s rarely found on cocktail menus. Baijiu, distilled from sorghum and rice, rules every festive occasion in China, where it’s the tipple of choice for everything from wedding receptions to business banquets.

Read More

Is the Baijiu Hype Really All That?

Is the Baijiu Hype Really All That?

News

As spirits go, baijiu (BYE-joe), which is Chinese for “white spirit,” must suffer from a serious inferiority complex in the U.S. While it holds a roughly 38 percent share in global spirits consumption, it has yet to take America by storm.

Read More

History in a Bottle: The Story of Moutai

History in a Bottle: The Story of Moutai

News

In China, there is an alcohol that’s been credited with improving international relations and uniting opposing empires. Described as the “drink of diplomacy,” it takes five years to produce a single bottle, and for nearly 400 years it has been distilled using traditional techniques out of a single town in China’s Guizhou Province.

Read More

Five Eye-Opening Examples of the World’s Most Popular Unknown Spirit

Five Eye-Opening Examples of the World’s Most Popular Unknown Spirit

News

The most-consumed spirit in the world—one that represents 35 percent of total global consumption—is a high-proof potable that few people outside of Asia have heard of. It is baijiu, the “official” drink of China, a nation of 1.3 billion people, and where drinking it to celebrate every conceivable occasion is more than a social endeavor; it is a way of life.

Read More

Baijiu Regains Its Investment Palate

Baijiu Regains Its Investment Palate

Business, News

Baijiu, the country’s home-grown firewater, accounts for more than a third of all spirits volumes drunk globally and more than a quarter of sales value. And while it’s gone through a tough few years in the wake of President Xi Jinping’s anti-corruption crackdown, China’s hard liquor market appears to be turning a corner.

Read More

1,000-Year-Old Chinese Liquor Wants to Be the New Tequila

1,000-Year-Old Chinese Liquor Wants to Be the New Tequila

News

The fiery Chinese grain liquor called baijiu has been distilled and quaffed in the homeland pretty much the same way for a millennium. Yet as these brands expand overseas, spirits companies are wondering: How would it taste with 7-Up? Read Full Article

Read More

Decanter wine reviews: Chateau Changyu Moser XV

Decanter wine reviews: Chateau Changyu Moser XV

News

Austrian winemaker Lenz Moser has been working with his Chinese colleague to create a range of wines worthy of attention outside the province of Ningxia, China. Read the Decanter reviews on three wines from the Ningxia estate. Lenz M. Moser represents the fifth generation of the Moser family of the Niederösterreich region of Austria.

Read More

Baijiu, popular in China, pops up in Back Bay’s Red Lantern

Baijiu, popular in China, pops up in Back Bay’s Red Lantern

News

Baijiu is the world’s most widely consumed spirit and, in the hands of celebrity mixologist Brother Cleve, it’s 
remaking the cocktail scene at Big Night Entertainment Group’s pan-Asian-flavored Red Lantern in Back Bay. “Baijiu is getting a real big push in the industry, but nobody else in Boston has really put a program around it,” said Cleve, whose revamped menu at Red Lantern features Asian-inspired cocktails that are cheekily named after 1970s kung fu movies.

Read More

Victoria Moore: red dawn for Chinese wine

Victoria Moore: red dawn for Chinese wine

News

The domed caps of the creamy stone towers echo those at Valençay. The cherubbed fountains (faintly) evoke the Boboli Gardens in Florence. It’s magnificent. It’s also brand new and, considering it was finished in 2013, after just two years of construction and at a cost of €70 million, there’s only one place it could be – and that’s nowhere near the Loire or the monuments of renaissance Italy, but in China.

Read More